Archive for June 5th, 2016

Specially for hackers : You can now run Kali Pentesting OS in your web browser

This bit of news is going to elate hackers and security researchers. Kali Linux is one of the most loved distros by the security community and it is now coming to in your browser.

Network security specialist Jerry Gamblin has created a project called KaliBrowser which allows you to run the world’s best loved Kali Linux operating system on a web browser. Gamblin has used Kali Linux Docker image, Openbox window manager, and NoVNC HTML5-based VNC client to bring Kali OS to your browser.

For the uninitiated, Kali Linux is often heralded as a must have Linux distro for hackers, security researchers and pentesters. It is one of the best security auditing operating systems based on the Linux kernel and the successor of the popular BackTrack. The Kali Linux has itself been upgraded to 2016.1, based on Debian GNU/Linux 8 “Jessie,” and that there’s an official Kali Linux Docker image that lets users run the distro on any platform.

Here’s how to get started with KaliBrowser right now

Those familiar with Kali Linux can use the Docker Linux container engine to run the penetration testing operating system on your web browser. The KaliBrowser can run on all operating systems including Microsoft’s latest Windows 10, by running the following command below in a terminal emulator.

sudo docker run -d -t -i -p 6080:6080 jgamblin/kalibrowser

Once that command finishes downloading and extracting all the files, all you have to do is to open your favorite web browser and point it to http://localhost:6080.

However, please note that this is a basic Kali Linux installation,  so you will need to add additional tools you want. It can be done by installing via the command-line.

The tutorial once again :

It runs the following packages:
Kali Docker
OpenBox
NoVNC

Getting started is as easy as:
docker run -d -t -i -p 6080:6080 jgamblin/kalibrowser

and then point your favorite browser to:
http://ip:6080

To keep this image as small  Gamblin has included only the base Linux (it is still 841MB) A bit advanced version is available here jgamblin/kalibrowser-top10 (2GB) that has the Kali Top 10 metapackage pre installed so if you want that  run:
docker run -d -t -i -p 6080:6080 jgamblin/kalibrowser-top10 

 

Following the official documentation for installing Nvidia driver on Kali 2.0 didn’t work for me. I installed nvidia-kernel-dkms, disabled nouveau driver, and rebooted. Then I had an error saying Something went wrong.. and presented with only a logout button. I was unable to login to the graphical interface. So I dug every bit of information in the internet and finally installed NVIDIA driver (361.28) on Kali (kernel 4.0.0).

Preparation

First, download the driver for your GPU. To know which driver to download, run lspci | grep -E "VGA|3D" command. It will show the GPU you currently have. Mine is GeForce GT 740M. Then look for the appropriate driver for your GPU at Nvidia website. Here are the archives for 64 bit and 32 bit system. After downloading the driver, place it somewhere in your home folder – we will be needing it later. Make it executable chmod +x ~/Downloads/NVIDIAxxxx.run.

Next, install the linux headers:

  • apt-get update && apt-get upgrade -y && apt-get dist-upgrade -y
  • aptitude -r install linux-headers-$(uname -r) Where -r means install all recommended packages as well.

 

If you have installed nvidia-kernel-dkms earlier, remove it and all nvidia packages by apt-get remove nvidia* --purge.

Disable nouveau driver

Create a file /etc/modprobe.d/nvidia-installer-disable-nouveau.conf and paste the following lines:

 Stop X server

We need to stop the X server so we can run the Nvidia installer. Kali2.0 uses gdm by default. You can stop the X server by stopping gdm systemctl stop gdm. Another way is to hit Ctrl+Alt+Backspace. You can also try the methods suggestedhere in case previous methods don’t work.

If nothing works then just restart. As you have already disabled nouveau, your kernel won;t be able to load X server or the nouveau driver.

Backup your xorg.conf file (optional)

cp /etc/X11/xorg.conf /etc/X11/xorg.conf.backup

Chances are, there won’t be any file to backup.

Install Nvidia Driver

Now, cd into the directory where the installer is located. Then run the installer ./NVIDIAxxxx.run -a. Just accept whatever the installer asks. For 64 bit systems, you might encounter a question about 32bit libs, just ignore it.

After the installation completes, we need to disable the nouveau driver and configure the X server.

Configure X server

(From the Arch wiki )

Then, configure xorg.conf. You will need to know the PCI address of the NVIDIA card, which you can find by issuing lspci | grep -E "VGA|3D". The PCI address is the first 7 characters of the line that mentions NVIDIA. It will look something like01:00.0. In the xorg.conf, you will need to format it as #:#:#; e.g. 01:00.0 would be formatted as 1:0:0.

In my case, the bus id for my GPU was 04:00.0.

Now, you can take the backup of the conf file created while installing Nvidia driver but it is 100% useless and will not work.

Edit/create the file /etc/X11/xorg.conf and add the following lines after removing any other text that is there in that file.

Then create a file /usr/share/gdm/greeter/autostart/display_setup.desktop and paste the following lines:

Reboot and you should be good to go.

Sources