All posts tagged Windows

If your computer’s waking up from sleep without any intervention from you, it’s likely another program or device is waking it up. Here’s how to find out what woke it up last.

We’ve shown you how to find out what’s keeping your computer from going to sleep, but if your computer keeps waking up after you put it to sleep, there’s a similar solution.

For Windows: If your computer is waking up regularly, finding the culprit can be tough—but finding the most recent wake cause is a good place to start. To do that, go to Start > Programs > Accessories, right-click on Command Prompt, and open it as an administrator. Then type:

The output will tell you what woke up your computer last, which—if you didn’t initiate it yourself—is probably your culprit.

Sometimes, unfortunately, it doesn’t give you quite enough information to deduce the problem, so you have to look elsewhere. Often, it’s a result of a “wake timer,” which can be a program, scheduled task, or other item that’s set to wake up your computer when it runs. You can disable wake timers in Windows’ Power Options. You may also find that your mouse or keyboard is waking up your computer even when you don’t touch them. For full instructions on how to dig deeper and fix these problems, check out this article at the How-To Geek.

For Mac: If you want to find out what woke up your Mac at a specific time, you can usually find it logged int he Console app. Just head to /Applications/Utilities, open up Console, and search for:

You should get a list of the last few wakes, and the reasons they were triggered.

I made the jump today to Windows 10 and like many other legacy (mobility) card users the support isn’t there (yet), besides the drivers which are automatically installed by Windows. Therefore, I thought I’d make a quick guide of how I got the legacy drivers installed on my laptop and have the Catalyst Control Center up and running. They are basically the same steps which I had to do with Windows 8/8.1 previously.

 

Drivers installed with this guide: Legacy

Windows version: Windows 10 Pro x64

Laptop: Dell Studio 1555

 

I suppose the following steps should also work for graphics card considered legacy now for desktops. However, do note that I applied these steps for my laptop which has a re-branded ATI Mobility Radeon HD 4650 (HD 5650).

 

 

Here are the steps:

 

1: Download the legacy driver for your system (legacy drivers link provided above) and run the installer but close it after it unpacked all the installation files to C:\AMD.

2: Open Device Manager.

3: Under Display adapters right click on the adapter used in your system and click Update Driver Software.

4: Click on the second option Browse my computer for driver software.

5: Click Let me pick from a list of device… in the next menu and Have Disk… on the following.

6: Click Browse on the pop-up menu and go to: C:\AMD\AMD_Catalyst_13.4_Legacy_Beta_Vista_Win7_Win8\Packages\Drivers\Display\W86A_INF.

7: Select the first .inf file – In my case this was: C7156445.inf – and click open.

8: Select the model from the list that corresponds to your hardware – there were two of the same in my case so I just clicked the first – and click Next. Afterwards the driver should install accompanied with several screen flickers.

9. Now re-run the legacy driver installer from AMD and have it install the Catalyst Control Center.

10. Restart the computer if you’d like.

 

This got it to work on my system and allows me to use CCC on Windows 10 with a Legacy (mobility) card.

 

I attached two screenshots below, one of CCC and another of the Device Manager, to show which drivers are installed now on my system. It is important to note that the Driver Version installed according to the device manager is 8.970.100.0 – in my case – which is different from the version installed automatically by Windows 10 would have the following numbers: 8.970.100.9001. I have no knowledge of if the drivers provided by Windows 10 are better or just the latest legacy beta drivers with a new signature for Windows 10.

I hope this helps some people along using older hardware but wanting to update to Windows 10.

This will work for sure. Just don’t be scared by the number of screen flicks that you will encounter.

 

Have fun! 🙂