Archive for November, 2016

I made the jump today to Windows 10 and like many other legacy (mobility) card users the support isn’t there (yet), besides the drivers which are automatically installed by Windows. Therefore, I thought I’d make a quick guide of how I got the legacy drivers installed on my laptop and have the Catalyst Control Center up and running. They are basically the same steps which I had to do with Windows 8/8.1 previously.

 

Drivers installed with this guide: Legacy

Windows version: Windows 10 Pro x64

Laptop: Dell Studio 1555

 

I suppose the following steps should also work for graphics card considered legacy now for desktops. However, do note that I applied these steps for my laptop which has a re-branded ATI Mobility Radeon HD 4650 (HD 5650).

 

 

Here are the steps:

 

1: Download the legacy driver for your system (legacy drivers link provided above) and run the installer but close it after it unpacked all the installation files to C:\AMD.

2: Open Device Manager.

3: Under Display adapters right click on the adapter used in your system and click Update Driver Software.

4: Click on the second option Browse my computer for driver software.

5: Click Let me pick from a list of device… in the next menu and Have Disk… on the following.

6: Click Browse on the pop-up menu and go to: C:\AMD\AMD_Catalyst_13.4_Legacy_Beta_Vista_Win7_Win8\Packages\Drivers\Display\W86A_INF.

7: Select the first .inf file – In my case this was: C7156445.inf – and click open.

8: Select the model from the list that corresponds to your hardware – there were two of the same in my case so I just clicked the first – and click Next. Afterwards the driver should install accompanied with several screen flickers.

9. Now re-run the legacy driver installer from AMD and have it install the Catalyst Control Center.

10. Restart the computer if you’d like.

 

This got it to work on my system and allows me to use CCC on Windows 10 with a Legacy (mobility) card.

 

I attached two screenshots below, one of CCC and another of the Device Manager, to show which drivers are installed now on my system. It is important to note that the Driver Version installed according to the device manager is 8.970.100.0 – in my case – which is different from the version installed automatically by Windows 10 would have the following numbers: 8.970.100.9001. I have no knowledge of if the drivers provided by Windows 10 are better or just the latest legacy beta drivers with a new signature for Windows 10.

I hope this helps some people along using older hardware but wanting to update to Windows 10.

This will work for sure. Just don’t be scared by the number of screen flicks that you will encounter.

 

Have fun! 🙂

Enable facetime or imessage in hackintosh is pretty straight forward. All you need is 5 minutes of your time! And yeah follow this guide. 🙂

Hello! Before I begin I just want to credit /u/johnnyfortune for their write-up here. Their instructions were mostly correct for me, but I had to add a few extra steps that I believe others will need to include as well. This may only apply to those that have never used iMessage on their machine in the past.

Mothing has really changed for sierra. It is the same what we did for el capitan hackintosh. Here it goes:

As for the instructions:

  1. Open CloverConfigurator and mount your EFI
  2. Open your config.plist
  3. In the Rt Variables section, make sure everything is clear.
  4. Go to the SMBIOS section and click on the magic wand. Match the specs options as best you can to your machine. On the two sections that say shake, click a few times to generate a random serial. Click ok.
  5. Go to https://selfsolve.apple.com/ and search for that serial number that was generated. If you get an error message, that is good. It means you aren’t using a serial number assigned to a real Mac. If you don’t get an error, repeat step 4 and search for the new serial instead.
  6. Open terminal and run “uuidgen”.
  7. Copy this UUID and paste it in the “SmUUID” field in the SMBIOS section.
  8. In the “Board Serial Number” field, paste in your system serial number (the one generated by the magic wand) and add 5 random letters and numbers to the end to reach a total of 17 characters.The reason for step 7 and 8 is to keep your ROM (last 12 digits of the UUID that was generated) and MLB (Board Serial Number) values constant and unique on each boot of the OS. If the values change from boot to boot, iMessage will notice and fail to activate and there is potential that Apple will notice and blacklist your UUID, serial, or Apple ID. All Clover-generated ROM and MLB values are automatically blacklisted, as well.
  9. Export config.plist
  10. In terminal, run the commands:
    1. defaults write com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles TRUE
    2. killall Finder
  11. Navigate to /Users/[Username]/Library/Chaches and delete all files or folders beginning with: (if there is nothing there with these file names, that is ok)
    1. com.apple.Messages
    2. com.apple.imfoundation.IMRemoteURLConnectionAgent
  12. Navigate to /Users/[Username]/Library/Preferences and delete all files or folders beginning with: (if there is nothing there with these file names, that is ok)
    1. com.apple.iChat.
    2. com.apple.imagent.
    3. com.apple.imessage.
    4. com.apple.imservice.
  13. Navigate to /Users/[Username]/Library and delete the folder “Messages”(if there is nothing there with that file name, that is ok).
  14. Empty the trash. If it says files are still in use, reboot and empty it immediately upon startup.
  15. Open up Disk Utility, select your OSX partition, and rebuild the permissions. Reboot when this is completed.
  16. The moment of truth: open up iMessage and attempt to sign in. It worked for me on the first try.
  17. If it worked, you can re-hide hidden files and folders with the terminal commands:
    1. defaults write com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles FALSE
    2. killall Finder

Feel free to ask me any questions! I hope this is helpful.

Edit: As some users have pointed out, your primary network must be set as en0. You can check this by opening up System Profiler, clicking on either Ethernet or Wifi and making sure that your internet network is listed as en0. If it is not, reset your network preferences by going to /Library/Preferences/SystemConfiguration and deleting “NetworkInterfaces.plist” and “preferences.plist”.

Initial guide taken from:

After a long hard day, it looks like I am all restored now. I was waiting to get some time on my hand to switch servers. My time with the AWS has been bittersweet. Thanks for the sweet deal I was able to keep my website up for free for a good time (10 months?).

Although I won’t really recommend using anyone to go with their base EC2 server which is obviously the only server that you can get for free. I was constantly running out of RAM and server would just shut down. There’s even to SWAP partition which really makes the server run on fumes!

I am getting much better pings now. Have no outage and the resource utilization is average as well. This for now looks to be the better choice now.

Finally added the much-needed SSL certs to the site and we are running exclusively on HTTPS. Yay!

 

Ironed out a lot of CSS issues. Although there are still some issues I would like to fix but I’m happy with the day’s worth of effort!

Better pings, here I come!

This article was published on Microsoft and was quickly taken down. I thought you guys might like it.

At Connect(); in November, Microsoft is launching a preview of Visual Studio for Mac. This is an exciting development, evolving the mobile-centric Xamarin Studio IDE into a true mobile-first, cloud-first development tool for .NET and C#, and bringing the Visual Studio development experience to the Mac.

A New Member of the Visual Studio Family

At its heart, Visual Studio for Mac is a macOS counterpart of the Windows version of Visual Studio. If you enjoy the Visual Studio development experience, but need or want to use macOS, you should feel right at home. Its UX is inspired by Visual Studio, yet designed to look and feel like a native citizen of macOS. And like Visual Studio for Windows, it’s complemented by Visual Studio Code for times when you don’t need a full IDE, but want a lightweight yet rich standalone source editor.

Below the surface, Visual Studio for Mac also has a lot in common with its siblings in the Visual Studio family. Its IntelliSense and refactoring use the Roslyn Compiler Platform; its project system and build engine use MSBuild; and its source editor supports TextMate bundles. It uses the same debugger engines for Xamarin and .NET Core apps, and the same designers for Xamarin.iOS and Xamarin.Android.

Compatibility is a key focus of Visual Studio for Mac. Although it’s a new product and doesn’t support all of the Visual Studio project types, for those it does have in common it uses the same MSBuild solution and project format. If you have team members on macOS and Windows, or switch between the two OSes yourself, you can seamlessly share your projects across platforms. There’s no need for any conversion or migration.

Mobile-First, Cloud-First Development

The primary workloads supported by Visual Studio for Mac are native iOS, Android and Mac development via Xamarin, and server development via .NET Core with Azure integration. It gives you all the tools you need to develop the rich, native mobile app experiences that users expect today, and the cloud-based server back ends to power them.

It’s all powered by the C# language you know and love, with the latest C# 7 productivity enhancements. You get the performance of compiled code, the productivity of a modern type-safe language, access to the unique features of each platform, and a rich ecosystem of libraries and tools. You can use your existing experience across the mobile and cloud domains, sharing code between client and server. And with all your projects in one solution, you can take advantage of solution-wide cross-project refactoring and code navigation.

C# isn’t the only language supported in the Visual Studio for Mac preview. For the functional programmers among you, it includes excellent F# support, powered by the same F# compiler used in Visual Studio.

iOS, Android and Mac

With the fragmented mobile market today it’s important to be able to target a wide range of devices. Because it’s based on Xamarin Studio, Visual Studio for Mac has mature support for C#-based iOS, Android and Mac development with the Xamarin Platform. You can take advantage of your existing C# experience and libraries, and share common code across platforms, with full access to the native APIs so you can build a fast, polished native app experience.

For even greater code sharing, you can use the cross-platform Xamarin.Forms UI library, which provides a familiar XAML-based development environment that can target multiple platforms, including iOS, Android, macOS and the Universal Windows Platform (UWP)—though UWP development is currently only supported in Visual Studio—and maps to the native UI on each platform. When you need more control, you can mix and match Xamarin.Forms with direct access to the native toolkits. There’s a huge ecosystem of libraries available for Xamarin via NuGet, too, including platform-specific libraries, bindings to native code and portable .NET Standard libraries.

Like Visual Studio, Visual Studio for Mac has drag-and-drop designers for iOS and Android development that let you rapidly assemble and fine-tune your UI. For Xamarin.Forms, it has rich XAML IntelliSense and a side-by-side live preview, as Figure 1 shows. Both the designer and the live preview use a simulator to render your app exactly how it will appear on the device, and this even works for your custom controls.

The Xamarin.Forms XAML Live Preview
Figure 1 The Xamarin.Forms XAML Live Preview

Cutting-Edge Cloud

Almost every mobile app is backed by a service, and Visual Studio for Mac makes it easy to develop your app’s service with its support for the latest ASP.NET Core Web development platform. ASP.NET Core runs on .NET Core, the latest evolution of the .NET Framework and runtime. It’s been tuned for blazingly fast performance, factored for small install sizes, and reimagined to run on Linux and macOS, as well as Windows.

.NET Core gives you a huge degree of flexibility in how and where you develop and deploy your server application, whether in your own datacenter or on a cloud platform such as Microsoft Azure. Because both .NET Core and Xamarin Platform are open source, you won’t have to worry about vendor lock-in.

The Visual Studio for Mac support for .NET Core projects also allows you to write .NET Standard libraries, the new way to share code across .NET platforms going forward. .NET Standard libraries replace Portable Class Libraries (PCLs) and offer a much broader API surface area. Because .NET Core and Xamarin Platform are .NET Standard-compliant, they’re a great way to share code, both within your solution and via the NuGet Package Manager.

A Familiar Workspace

The Visual Studio for Mac workspace should be familiar to existing Visual Studio developers. When you first open it, you see a Welcome Page with a list of recently opened solutions, a feed of developer news and other information to help you get started.

To create a new solution, go to the File menu and select New Project, and you’ll see the workspace containing your new solution. As you can see in Figure 2, there’s a central tabbed source editor with a number of other docked windows or “pads” around it, such as Solution, Output, Properties, Document Outline and Toolbox. Like Visual Studio, this layout is highly customizable and switches automatically, depending on whether you’re coding, debugging or using the drag-and-drop designer.

The Visual Studio for Mac Workspace
Figure 2 The Visual Studio for Mac Workspace

The toolbar is familiar, too, but has a few notable differences:

On the left is the Run button, a dropdown to select the Active Configuration, as well as dropdowns to select the Run Configuration and Target Device. For cross-platform mobile development, it’s important to be able to easily switch the device or simulator on which you’re testing or debugging your app. The Run Configuration is like the startup project in Visual Studio, except that in addition to switching which project runs, you can also create custom-named sets of run options.

In the center of the toolbar is a notification area, which shows messages about various operations, such as building or restoring NuGet packages. When there’s a running operation, a cancel button shows up in the notification area. This is also where notifications about software updates are displayed. You can click on some notifications, such as build errors, and they’ll bring up a pad with more information.

At the right of the toolbar is the global search. In addition to helping you find things like commands and files in your solution, its camelCase filtering system makes it an excellent way to quickly activate commands, or jump to files or types in your solution. It can even kick off a Find in Files search in your solution, or open the NuGet Package Manager to search for a package.

The Solution pad works much the same as the Solution Explorer in Visual Studio, letting you explore and manage the structure of your solution, your project and the files in it. The context menu gives you a range of context-specific commands on the items in the solution tree, such as adding or removing files from projects, editing project references, opening Terminal windows in folders, and building or debugging specific projects.

The Errors pad shows any build warnings and errors, and is also where you can find the build log output in a split view. Unlike Visual Studio, there isn’t a single unified pad for all kinds of output. For example, an Application Output pad shows the output from your app when you run or debug it, and logs from NuGet operations are shown in a NuGet Console pad. The Properties pad contextually shows properties of whatever is currently focused and selected, and can be used to view and change the build action of files in the solution pad.

In the center is the heart of the IDE, the source editor, which has all the features you’d expect from a member of the Visual Studio family. Figure 3 shows C# IntelliSense and syntax highlighting in a .NET Core project. There’s also code folding, live underlining of errors and suggestions as you type, configurable automatic formatting, code navigation commands and an array of powerful refactoring tools.

IntelliSense in a .NET Core Project
Figure 3 IntelliSense in a .NET Core Project

Not all of the editor’s functionality is enabled by default. You can tweak the Visual Studio for Mac settings in the Preferences dialog, which is accessible from its Mac application menu. This is equivalent to the Options dialog in the Visual Studio Tools menu, and contains plenty of options to help you customize the IDE to work the way you want.

Unit testing is supported using NUnit, and other test runners can be plugged in via extensions. The tests discovered in your assembly are shown in a Unit Tests pad that can be accessed from the View | Pads menu. There’s also git version control integrated right into the source editor, with a row of tabs along the bottom of the editor to access the current file’s log, diff and blame view.

If you’d like to get up to speed quickly with some more tips and tricks, I encourage you to watch my “Become a Xamarin Studio Expert” session from Xamarin Evolve 2016 (xmn.io/xs-expert) as its content applies directly to Visual Studio for Mac.

Open Source Core

Like Xamarin Studio, Visual Studio for Mac is based on the open source MonoDevelop IDE, which is actively developed by Microsoft. It’s written entirely in C#, and has a rich extensibility model that you can use to add functionality ranging from simple editor commands to entirely new languages and project types. Even core features such as C# editing, Xamarin.iOS, Xamarin.Android and ASP.NET Core are implemented as extensions.

Like Visual Studio and Visual Studio Code, the C# support in Visual Studio for Mac is powered by the open source Roslyn Compiler Platform. You get the exact same IntelliSense experience you’re familiar with from Visual Studio, as well as support for in-editor live Analyzers and Code Fixes. Visual Studio for Mac even includes the Refactoring Essentials collection of Analyzers and Code Fixes by default.

Visual Studio for Mac supports editing a wide range of languages though the use of TextMate bundles, which provide syntax highlighting and simple IntelliSense. It includes a number of open source TextMate bundles from Visual Studio Code.

Creating an ASP.NET Core App

To show you how easy it is to get up to speed with Visual Studio for Mac, I’m going to walk though creating a simple ASP.NET Core back end. It’s for a hypothetical “Shared To-do List” mobile app, which allows multiple users to add items, and all users see the items that any of them post.

Please note that I’m writing this article using a pre-release version of Visual Studio for Mac, and some details of the UI may change in the release. However, the approaches and concepts discussed in this article will still apply.

After installing and opening Visual Studio for Mac, I start by clicking on the New Solution button on the welcome page, which opens the New Project dialog. I navigate into the Cloud section, choose the ASP.NET Core Web Application template, and click Next, then choose the Web API template. The Web API template creates a RESTful Web service which is perfect for a mobile back end, though you can add views to the project later to create a Web front end.

Finally, I name my project HelloVSMac and click Create. Visual Studio for Mac creates the projects using the dotnet templating engine, opens it and starts restoring the NuGet packages on which it depends. If you open the project file in the editor using the Tools | Edit File context menu on the project in the solution pad, you can see that it’s a minimalistic MSBuild-based project file that’s intended to be easy to understand. If you edit it directly and save it, the IDE will automatically reload your modified version.

Looking at the project in the solution pad, the key items are:

Packages: Your project’s NuGet package dependencies. ASP.NET Core, the .NET Core framework and the MSBuild targets that build the project are all installed via NuGet packages.

Program.cs: The entry point of your Web app. ASP.NET Core apps are programs, so there’s a Main method entry point that creates, builds and runs the WebHost at the heart of your app.

Startup.cs: Which defines a Startup class that was passed to the WebHost. This class contains your application’s initialization methods.

appsettings.json: Your app’s configuration settings. This is the ASP.NET Core equivalent of the ASP.NET web.config.

For the purposes of this walk-through, I’ll leave these all as is, and look at the ValuesController.cs file in the Views folder. This contains a ValuesController class registered on the [Route(“api/[controller]”)] route. The [controller] is a placeholder for the class name, so this is really the api/values route.

I’ll start by defining a very simple ToDoItem class and a ToDoList storage class. ToDoList is static so it can be shared among requests. In a real app you’d use a database for this, but it will do for now. I also rename the controller class to ToDoController (which makes the route api/todo), connect the Get and Post methods to the store, and clear out the other unused controller methods. The result can be seen in Figure 4.

Figure 4 The Controller and Its Simple Shared To-Do List Storage

This is now a complete, but very small, RESTful Web service. Let’s try it out.

I place a breakpoint in the Post method, and start debugging the app. The Output pad starts to show the output from the ASP.NET Core built-in kestrel Web server as the app starts up, by default on port 5000, but it won’t do anything else until it receives a request. You can open your Web browser and check 127.0.0.1:5000/api/todo, but it’ll just be an empty array.

Debugging a .NET Core Project
Figure 5  Debugging a .NET Core Project

Because there isn’t a mobile client for this service yet, it’s time to open the macOS Terminal app and use curl to send a POST request to the app:

This triggers the breakpoint in the debugger. You can inspect the value that has automatically been parsed from the JSON body of the request and converted into the ToDoItem object. You can see that Visual Studio for Mac automatically entered the debugging layout, and has all the debugger pads you’d expect: Stack, Locals, Threads, Breakpoints and so on.

Now, go back to the terminal and use curl to access the Get method, and you’ll see the JSON array containing the item that was added:

The next step is to build the mobile app, but I’ll let you explore that yourself. For more in-depth information on ASP.NET Core, I recommend checking out asp.net/get-started, and if you’d like to learn more about Xamarin development, there’s plenty of great material at developer.xamarin.com. Although there isn’t much documentation on Visual Studio for Mac yet, the Xamarin Studio documentation applies directly in most cases, and Visual Studio documentation is often applicable, too.

Wrapping Up

I hope this brief overview has whetted your appetite to try Visual Studio for Mac and make it your macOS IDE of choice for cloud and mobile development! If you have a Mac I encourage you to download the preview from VisualStudio.com, give it a spin, and let us know how you like it. We’re excited to hear your feedback to help guide it through the preview and beyond.

 

Source:

https://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:Vk2On-9psscJ:https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/mt790182.aspx+&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=uk

So I finally decided to take my server online but not without a few hiccups.

The problem is I wanted to begin with mLabs but somehow my firewall was blocking it. So I decided to host it on my server and connect directly into it.

Installing it was not a problem. If you are used to Ubuntu or a linux OS, you would be very familiar with it. Although you would need to add few firewall rules as you don’t want everyone to access your instance remotely. So at the end we will add our own IP to the firewall rule.

 

Step 1 — Adding the MongoDB Repository

MongoDB is already included in Ubuntu package repositories, but the official MongoDB repository provides most up-to-date version and is the recommended way of installing the software. In this step, we will add this official repository to our server.

Ubuntu ensures the authenticity of software packages by verifying that they are signed with GPG keys, so we first have to import they key for the official MongoDB repository.

  • sudo apt-key adv –keyserver hkp://keyserver.ubuntu.com:80 –recv EA312927

After successfully importing the key, you will see:

Output

Next, we have to add the MongoDB repository details so apt will know where to download the packages from.

Issue the following command to create a list file for MongoDB.

  • echo “deb http://repo.mongodb.org/apt/ubuntu xenial/mongodb-org/3.2 multiverse” | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/mongodb-org-3.2.list

After adding the repository details, we need to update the packages list.

  • sudo apt-get update

Step 2 — Installing and Verifying MongoDB

Now we can install the MongoDB package itself.

  • sudo apt-get install -y mongodb-org

This command will install several packages containing latest stable version of MongoDB along with helpful management tools for the MongoDB server.

In order to properly launch MongoDB as a service on Ubuntu 16.04, we additionally need to create a unit file describing the service. A unit file tells systemd how to manage a resource. The most common unit type is a service, which determines how to start or stop the service, when should it be automatically started at boot, and whether it is dependent on other software to run.

We’ll create a unit file to manage the MongoDB service. Create a configuration file named mongodb.service in the /etc/systemd/system directory using nano or your favorite text editor.

  • sudo nano /etc/systemd/system/mongodb.service

Paste in the following contents, then save and close the file.

/etc/systemd/system/mongodb.service

This file has a simple structure:

  • The Unit section contains the overview (e.g. a human-readable description for MongoDB service) as well as dependencies that must be satisfied before the service is started. In our case, MongoDB depends on networking already being available, hence network.target here.
  • The Service section how the service should be started. The User directive specifies that the server will be run under the mongodb user, and the ExecStart directive defines the startup command for MongoDB server.
  • The last section, Install, tells systemd when the service should be automatically started. The multi-user.target is a standard system startup sequence, which means the server will be automatically started during boot.

Next, start the newly created service with systemctl.

  • sudo systemctl start mongodb

While there is no output to this command, you can also use systemctl to check that the service has started properly.

  • sudo systemctl status mongodb
Output

The last step is to enable automatically starting MongoDB when the system starts.

  • sudo systemctl enable mongodb

The MongoDB server now configured and running, and you can manage the MongoDB service using the systemctl command (e.g. sudo systemctl mongodb stop, sudo systemctl mongodb start).

Step 3 — Adjusting the Firewall (Optional)

Assuming you have followed the initial server setup tutorial instructions to enable the firewall on your server, MongoDB server will be inaccessible from the internet.

If you intend to use the MongoDB server only locally with applications running on the same server, it is a recommended and secure setting. However, if you would like to be able to connect to your MongoDB server from the internet, we have to allow the incoming connections in ufw.

To allow access to MongoDB on its default port 27017 from everywhere, you could use sudo ufw allow 27017. However, enabling internet access to MongoDB server on a default installation gives unrestricted access to the whole database server.

in most cases, MongoDB should be accessed only from certain trusted locations, such as another server hosting an application. To accomplish this task, you can allow access on MongoDB’s default port while specifying the IP address of another server that will be explicitly allowed to connect.

  • sudo ufw allow from your_other_server_ip/32 to any port 27017

You can verify the change in firewall settings with ufw.

  • sudo ufw status

You should see traffic to 27017 port allowed in the output.If you have decided to allow only a certain IP address to connect to MongoDB server, the IP address of the allowed location will be listed instead of Anywhere in the output.

Output

More advanced firewall settings for restricting access to services are described in UFW Essentials: Common Firewall Rules and Commands.

 

Now we have successfully installed the DB on our server. The second part is how to access it. 

You can’t just use the direct IP and login. What we will do is SSH into our VPS and connect as a localhost. Simple 🙂

 

In the “Connection” panel:
Address – localhost
Port – 27017

 

in the “SSH” panel:
Address – <your_ip_or_fqdn>:22
and use a private key auth or your password.

 

This will connect via port 22 and redirect traffic sent to port 27017

Mongo on your droplet is set to respond only to traffic from localhost which is where the ssh tunnel comes in handy. Running db.serverCmdLineOpts() from the mongoshell will tell you what it is bound to.

 

There is another “LESS” secure way to connect which I don’t recommend. But if you are dev testing your app to your remote server, this might be the way to go.

You need to change the Bind IP option

Bind IP is a MongoDB option that restricts connections to specifics IPs.

Have a look at your mongod configuration file, most of the time bind.ip is set to 127.0.0.1 for obvious security reasons. You can:

  1. Add your desired IP by concatenating a list of comma separated values to bind MongoDB to multiple IP addresses.
  2. Remove or comment (with # character) the bind_ip line. But be aware that all remote connection will be able to connect your MongoDB server!

More about bind_ip configuration option: https://docs.mongodb.com/manual/reference/configuration-options/#net.bindIp

Bind IP can also be set as a command argument: http://docs.mongodb.org/manual/reference/program/mongod/#cmdoption–bind_ip

SSH into your server:

nano /etc/mongod.conf

Comment your bindIp snippet in the file. This is how it should look now:

network interfaces
net:
port: 27017
# bindIp: 127.0.0.1

 

You can also add your specific IP to bind IP. This actually is the better way to do it. As you will only be able to access it from your machine/IP. Change it to look like this:

network interfaces
net:
port: 27017
# bindIp: 127.0.0.1,your_ip_address_goes_here